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Global Cleaning 2014

| TOPIC NO. 1 SPRINT V Peter Hartmann | Editor-in-Chief | peter.hartmann@holzmann-medien.de “It’s not just about doing the right thing. It’s about doing the right thing sustainably.” Cleaning means responsibility Cleaning used to mean just that: making sure that what had to be cleaned got cleaned and stayed clean. Today, it covers many more aspects, from preserving the environment by using fewer resources and reducing pollution, to preserving the health and wellbeing of the people working in the industry. In this context, burnout has become a hot-button issue that has to be taken seriously where people find themselves under mounting pressure and stress. The WHO foresees burnout becoming the second most common health issue by 2030. Besides giving pause, it is also an indication of how pertinent the issue (p. 8 ff.) already has become and the attention we should give it – for the sake of running a sound business, but more importantly for the sake of cleaning crews. Increasingly, responsible entrepreneurs see the value in instituting health management practices that support employees at all levels and protect them against mental and physical stress. Still, keeping premises clean will in some cases never be a walk in the park. The annual Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, illustrates the point. For 16 days in a row, simple after all the daytime fun and revelry comes the nighttime cleaning. And that means dealing with the worst kinds of soiling under the toughest conditions – and not resting to ensure ergonomic everything is spotless before dawn breaks. (p. 15 ff.) Cleaning commercial kitchens looks easy by comparison, but don’t let the first impression ground-breaking fool you. Here, the focus on hygiene awareness and attention takes on a whole new dimension. (p. 28 ff.) A HACCP roadmap, for instance, provides a dependable guide that has to be adhered to no matter what. The same level of precision and commitment applies to service providers and their staff who work in hygiene-sensitive facilities. (p. 32 ff) Here, health code violations can lead to fatal outcomes – not only for patients, but, in business terms, also for service providers. If there is a nosocomial outbreak, for instance, and the cleaning service provider can’t prove that it’s not due to his use of unlisted disinfectants (approved products on the VAH list), the service provider is liable for consequential damage. Providing a cleaning service means giving your best and letting all your skills, competencies and experience shine through. Whether it’s floor coverings, glass and building frontage or public areas or schools – cleaning means showing top professionalism, technical know-how and dedication anew every day. To a growing degree it also means bringing sustainability into the equation. Cleaning responsibly is not only about doing the right thing, but also doing the right thing sustainably – and this is creating new challenges in terms of defining and organizing cleaning tasks as well. Well-functioning processes, by the way, not only create much-needed transparency. They are also conducive to a more open, friendly and positive work environment. And that in turn contributes to health and wellbeing, which, ultimately, is at the core of what we do in the cleaning industry. Enjoy the read! www.vermop.com Peter Hartmann Service-Line + 49 9342 878-800 GLOBAL CLEANING | April 2014   3


Global Cleaning 2014
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